Forget What You Know About Millennials and Print

Millennials and phones

 

Popular stereotypes lead observers to believe that millennials think print is dead, but that isn’t true. Research shows this demographic group appreciates a more diverse collection of communication channels than you may have thought. They see value in printed material and sometimes engage with print more deeply than do older adults! The key in reaching millennials with print is making sure the content is relevant and personalized. They will reject messaging meant for a different demographic and they expect companies to use information they have compiled about consumers to influence future communications.

In a report entitled “Millennials and the Mail” the US Postal Service’s Office of Inspector General published findings about how millennials interact with direct mail marketing. Surprisingly, 62% of millennials participating in the survey said they had visited a store within a month of receiving information in the mail. This response outpaced Gen X consumers and baby boomers.

Millennials especially appreciate local business and restaurant coupons. Over 65% of millennials said they liked receiving this type of advertising mail. Ads for restaurants and local businesses without coupons also fared well.

Since technology keeps millennials constantly connected, they are exposed to lots of advertising, but it’s not always effective. About half the members of this generation say they ignore digital ads, but direct mail breaks through the clutter. Perhaps because they receive fewer ads in physical form, 87% of millennials say they enjoy receiving direct mail.

Strategic Print Works with Millennials

That doesn’t mean marketers can revert to traditional “spray and pray” methods for attracting millennial attention via direct mail. This generation doesn’t like to be “sold”. Heavy handed sales pitches will turn off millennial buyers. Honest and straightforward approaches will forge stronger connections with the target audience.

Though they appreciate being contacted by mail, millennials would like to see advertisers making more of an effort through better segmentation and personalization. They will instantly discard irrelevant mail. Updated direct mail that uses multiple channels or technologies such as augmented reality or near field communications will also get attention from millennials.

All advertising should be easy to consume, but messaging aimed at millennials should be brief and easily understood. Save the in-depth details for linked communications you can deliver via video or other formats.

More than any generation before them, millennials are interested in helping others. Campaigns featuring matching charitable donations or other demonstrations of social responsibility will strike a chord with this group.

 

Political Mail for Millennials

Though political campaigns have definitely gone digital, mail remains a critical component of a multi-channel approach. Millennials read their political mail and are more likely to discuss the material with others and visit a candidate’s website referenced on a printed piece. They are also likely to go online to research opponents or be exposed to contrasting views.

In a study by the USPS and the American Association of Political Consultants (AAPC), researchers found millennials are accustomed to verifying information through multiple sources. They use political mail as a means to integrate information and access websites and social media relevant to the mail pieces. Printed materials with no online references are viewed by millennials as incomplete.

Political mail can also be an educational resource about elections. Printed materials tell millennials when and where to vote, inform them about registration, or remind them about early voting deadlines.

From a trust perspective, millennials consider political mail as coming directly from candidates. They believe the information is being delivered with no filters or news source bias. This is an important factor considering all the concern about misleading information disseminated via social media.

The AAPC study includes several direct mail design tips and strategies still relevant for today’s national, state, and local elections. Download the white paper HERE for good ideas about how to leverage print for political campaigns.

Millennials are not digital addicts who engage exclusively with online material. They see print as relevant and a good percentage of them have taken action after seeing printed marketing material. If millennials are a segment of your target audience, don’t miss the opportunity to connect with them via print.